THE INVISIBLE HAND at Olney Theatre Center

The reviews for The Invisible Hand at Olney Theatre Center! Follow the links for the full articles.

*Washington Post, “As Bashir, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh purposefully sounds Pakistani by way of London, and he blends the character’s defensive ego with a savvy streak… you can almost hear the brain and the blood whir…”

*MDTheatreGuide, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh… gives a performance that can send chills down your spine—not so much for the rare instances of violence—but for the complete portrayal of a man so conflicted and so desperate to believe in the rightness of his cause that he practically vibrates at times.”

*DCTheatreScene, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh delivers a mighty, sinewy performance as the London-born revolutionary Bashir who travels back to his ancestral land to follow the charismatic Imam Saleem. He has to navigate a tightrope, balancing Bashir’s altruistic desires, passionate beliefs, and the appalling actions he ultimately takes.”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “It would be hard to find a better portrayer of Bashir than Ebrahimzadeh, who completely embodies this character. He becomes Bashir…

*CultureSpotMC, Interview with Maboud Ebrahimzadeh and Thomas Keegan, Full Article.

THE BOOK OF WILL at Round House Theatre

The reviews for The Book of Will at Round House Theatre! Follow the links for the full articles.

*WashingtonPost, “… with winning lead turns from Todd Scofield and Maboud Ebrahimzadeh as the actors on a hunt…”

*CityPaper, “There’s really no reason this shouldn’t be the movie it already feels like, and it’s tough to imagine Hollywood could improve upon Round House Theatre’s cast: Todd Scofield and Maboud Ebrahimzadeh as Misters Heminges and Condell, respectively…”

*DCTheatreScene, “The chief virtue of Ryan Rilette’s production is the all-star ensemble and the rich variety of vibrant characters they bring to life… [Ebrahimzadeh’s Condell is] fiery and headstrong…”

*BroadwayWorld, “Henry Condell, hilariously played by Maboud Ebrahimzadeh… Under Ryan Rilette’s excellent direction, a uniformly marvelous cast gives one of the best ensemble performances I’ve seen this season of a very strong play.”

*EntertainmentOrDie, “… the leading pair of Scofield and Ebrahimzadeh really put the heart and soul into the story…”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “Todd Scofield and Maboud Ebrahimzadeh give both these characters good presence…”

*MDTheatreGuide, “Ebrahimzadeh’s Condell offers a more fiery persona…”

 

THE PRICE at Arena Stage

*Washington Post, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is another of Sueko’s assets; his earthy, blunt style feels exactly right as Victor. Ebrahimzadeh channels the character’s intelligence and good-guy ethics lightly, which is pivotal if you’re going to keep Miller’s play from feeling like a righteous harangue.”

*BrightestYoungThings, “The actor who pulls the play out of the fire is Ebrahimzadeh. He has the hardest work to do, playing moments of revelation, shame, moral righteousness, and quite a bit of pain, and he dives in. The climax is his.”

*BroadwayWorld, “Attention must certainly be paid especially to Maboud Ebrahimzadeh. He’s delivered a number of wonderful performances on area stages in the past few years (his performance in Round House Theatre’s Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo was particularly memorable), but his work at Arena surpasses all of that. It’s that sensational. Nuanced yet explosive acting when required, he reveals all of Victor’s many layers with considerable skill.”

*WomanAroundTown, “As Victor, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh goes toe to toe with Linden. Solomon uses the various pieces of furniture to draw Victor out about his father and their lives. Ebrahimzadeh displays a range of emotions during these conversations that sum up his feelings about his father and his life.”

*TheaterMania, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh plays Victor with conviction, expressing just the right amount of tension until the last burst of fireworks, when he lets his temper flare completely. He alternates between those tense moments with his brother and extremely tender ones with his wife, who needs a lot of pampering.”

*Alexandria Times, “Playing off an exceptional performance of Maboud Ebrahimzadeh as Victor Franz, a frustrated cop who failed to realize his potential, this production, artfully directed by Seema Sueko, is a well-cast delight that brings both searing drama and mood-lightening humor to the American stage.”

*MDTheatreGuide, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh portrayal of Victor is heartbreaking in his reactions to the family treachery he learns about. It is a pitch-perfect depiction of a good man coming to terms with decisions (a word used very often by his brother) that he had known nothing of, and yet which impacted his life so deeply.”

*MetroWeekly, “At the center is the put-upon Victor Franz, a man trying to stand his ground against the world’s expectations and his own self-doubt. Bringing a skillful mix of confidence and agitation, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is memorably compelling as this husband and troubled younger brother. He very much gets Miller’s syncopation and his rhythms of expression…”

*TheDCMoms, “Go to The Price for Linden, but stay for the standout performance by Maboud Ebrahimzadeh…”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “Ebrahimzadeh’s Victor might not have the edge of a police officer who has been on the beat for half his life, but he more than makes up for it with his stoically repressed delivery.”

TIMON OF ATHENS at Folger Theatre

*DCTheatreScene, “As for Ebrahimzadeh, he has, for as long as I’ve watched him (nearly ten years, now), been a subject-matter expert in presenting characters whose pleasant facades mask a violent impulse. He outdoes himself as Alcibaides, though…. That Ebrahimzadeh can do this with little help from the text shows what a fine economical actor he is, and how suited to this role.”

*DCMetroTheaterArts, ” Alcibiades (a solid, stoic, friend-to-the-end Maboud Ebrahimzadeh) defeats Athens but promises to protect the city and its citizens.”

*BroadwayWorld, “The support cast is often just as inspired,… Maboud Ebrahimzadeh‘s thoughtful soldier Alcibiades among the standouts.”

*DCist, “Ebrahimzadeh and Robinson are wonderful, warm, and genuine in their roles, providing the sole rays of hope for those who wish to believe in mankind’s goodness.

*TheatreBloom, “The only one among them who sets themselves apart is the noble, albeit misguided, Alcibiades… Ebrahimzadeh takes the character on a transformative journey, which opens up his inner rogue spirits for all to see by the second act.”

*TheaterMania, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is stalwart as Alcibiades, the military man who is Timon’s friend.”

DISGRACED at Milwaukee Rep

*BroadwayWorld, “a polished, emotionally reactive actor Maboud Ebrahimzadeh…”

*Journal Sentinel (USA Today), “… embodied by a compelling Maboud Ebrahimzadeh.”

*Shepard Express, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh excels as Amir, delicately revealing increasing momentary flashes of insecurity amid his growing identity crisis while trying to remain confident.”

*MilwaukeeMag.com, “… the focus is always on Amir, portrayed with blistering intensity by Ebrahimzadeh.”

*UrbanMilwaukee.com, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is astonishingly active and disturbing as Amir… The actor in both stillness and manic activity reveals the troubling tics and wrenching fury of his behavior.”