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Next stop, Hartford Stage!

The cast of Murder on the Orient Express at McCarter Theatre

ATTENTION ALL PASSENGERS:

With only one week of performances left at the McCarter Theatre, we can now officially announce that Ken Ludwig’s new adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express will be leaving the McCarter Theatre Center and pulling into Hartford Stage as part of their 2017-2018 season!

Eight Suspects, One Thrilling Ride

The exotic Orient Express is about to go off the rails! With a locomotive full of suspects and an alibi for each one, it’s the perfect mystery for detective Hercule Poirot, n’est-ce pas? Wax your mustache and hold on to your passport—adapted from Agatha Christie’s masterpiece, two-time Tony-nominated playwright Ken Ludwig and multi-award-winning director Emily Mann will take you on a suspenseful, thrilling ride aboard the legendary Orient Express!

Follow the link for more details!

https://www.hartfordstage.org/2017-2018-season/

Reviews

TIMON OF ATHENS at Folger Theatre

*DCTheatreScene, “As for Ebrahimzadeh, he has, for as long as I’ve watched him (nearly ten years, now), been a subject-matter expert in presenting characters whose pleasant facades mask a violent impulse. He outdoes himself as Alcibaides, though…. That Ebrahimzadeh can do this with little help from the text shows what a fine economical actor he is, and how suited to this role.”

*DCMetroTheaterArts, ” Alcibiades (a solid, stoic, friend-to-the-end Maboud Ebrahimzadeh) defeats Athens but promises to protect the city and its citizens.”

*BroadwayWorld, “The support cast is often just as inspired,… Maboud Ebrahimzadeh‘s thoughtful soldier Alcibiades among the standouts.”

*DCist, “Ebrahimzadeh and Robinson are wonderful, warm, and genuine in their roles, providing the sole rays of hope for those who wish to believe in mankind’s goodness.

*TheatreBloom, “The only one among them who sets themselves apart is the noble, albeit misguided, Alcibiades… Ebrahimzadeh takes the character on a transformative journey, which opens up his inner rogue spirits for all to see by the second act.”

*TheaterMania, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is stalwart as Alcibiades, the military man who is Timon’s friend.”

DISGRACED at Milwaukee Rep

*BroadwayWorld, “a polished, emotionally reactive actor Maboud Ebrahimzadeh…”

*Journal Sentinel (USA Today), “… embodied by a compelling Maboud Ebrahimzadeh.”

*Shepard Express, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh excels as Amir, delicately revealing increasing momentary flashes of insecurity amid his growing identity crisis while trying to remain confident.”

*MilwaukeeMag.com, “… the focus is always on Amir, portrayed with blistering intensity by Ebrahimzadeh.”

*UrbanMilwaukee.com, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is astonishingly active and disturbing as Amir… The actor in both stillness and manic activity reveals the troubling tics and wrenching fury of his behavior.”

DISGRACED at McCarter Theatre

*Philly.com, “Ebrahimzadeh, charm ablaze, repeats the smartest trick in Akhtar’s playbook, the same one at the heart of The Invisible Hand: With whom do we identify? Amir is so likeable, so reasonable. He’s us, and yet he’s not. And if he’s not us, who are we?”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “At the center of it all, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is captivating as protagonist Amir… He has an easy grace and an infectious smile, at war with an inner turmoil, yet still especially compassionate in scenes with his nephew Abe (Abit Dileep). There are times when the circumstances seem so stacked against him that the playwright retains the upper hand, but Ebrahimzadeh’s natural charisma and nobility make this uniquely flawed anti-hero a joy to explore.”

*Phindie.com, “Of the three productions I’ve seen of Ayad Akhtar’s honest, far-reaching play, Marcela Lorca’s staging for Princeton’s McCarter Theatre is the best. By far. By miles. One reason for that is the stirring tour de force performance of Maboud Ebrahimzadeh, already in award contention for his work in another Akhtar piece, Theatre Exile’s The Invisible Hand. Ebrahimzadeh thoroughly and humanly shows you the thousand compartmental traits and dimensions that compose his character, Amir Kapoor… Ebrahimzadeh is an actor of super-tactile sensitivity and honest emotion. ”

*NJArts.net, “The production, directed by Marcela Lorca — and featuring an intense, wrenching performance by Maboud Ebrahimzadeh as its central character, Amir, a Pakistani-American lawyer — does justice to this powder keg of a play…  It’s doubtful that you’ll ever have a chance to see a significantly better [production].”

*BroadStreetReview, ” Ebrahimzadeh plays Amir with humor and charm, revealing a man who’s reinvented himself to fit into a culture wary of Muslims, but who now doesn’t know who or what he is, as we find out in an explosion of violence that doesn’t ring true, more because of the script than the performances, after secrets are revealed.”

*NJ.com, “Ebrahimzadeh is a wonder, allowing us to understand the internal contradictions of a man who has spent decades trying to come to terms with his religious upbringing — and his experiences as a Muslim in America — but remains incapable of making sense of things.”

*CentralJersey.com, “Ebrahimzadeh is brilliant as Amir, a man whose confidence is shattered. His emotional turmoil is truly affecting.”

*TownTopics.com, “Ebrahimzadeh as Amir provides a strong, convincing focus for the action of the play — in his sophisticated swagger as a confident, successful lawyer; in his loving, often difficult interactions with his wife; in his attempts to help his nephew; in his contentious relationships with Isaac and Jory; in his struggle to reconcile his Muslim heritage with his ambitious pursuit of the American Dream; and in his ultimate disgrace.”

THE INVISIBLE HAND at Theatre Exile

*Philly.com, “It’s an excellent cast, but Ebrahimzadeh gets Bashir just right, from his tight shoulders and flitting eyes to the way the tension in the room relaxes when he does.”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “As Bashir, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh makes for an excellent contrast with [Ian Merrill] Peakes – open and playful at times but brimming with stubbornness, and scowling when he feels he’s being condescended to.”

*Broad Street Review, “The play’s most fascinating scenes occur between Nick (Ian Merrill Peakes) and Bashir (Maboud Ebrahimzadeh)… The performances are extraordinarily convincing, and it’s refreshing to see Muslim characters who aren’t evil stereotypes.”

*Phindie.com, “The four actors, all of whom appear to be extraordinarily bright, approach their roles with grounded intensity and unfussy concentration.”

THE PILLOWMAN at Forum Theatre

*Washington Post, “This version, too, often artfully exploits the border area between humor, suspense and dread. Part of the credit goes to Ebrahimzadeh’s persuasive portrait of Katurian as a laid-back yet cocky working-class striver and to Konicek’s affecting turn as the alarmingly childlike Michal.”

*DCTheatreScene, “Cannily shaded performances from Maboud Ebrahimzadeh and especially James Konicek are key draws in Forum Theatre’s revival… a nuanced and emotionally plangent rapport between Ebrahimzadeh and Konicek, who take the time to connect not just with the words and the claims in the text, but with each other’s eyes and bodies in the playing space. There’s a convincing sense that they’ve lived long together, that only they know what they know. And as the play’s circumstances force a change in that dynamic, the emotional cost for both men, and for the audience, is substantial.”

*TheatreBloom, “Ebrahimzadeh delivers his character with a striking level of vulnerability and earnestness. There is no subversion or provocation in his portrayal, only honest emotions, most of which translate plainly across his vividly expressed face. When Ebrahimzadeh delves into ‘storytelling mode’ either directly to the audience, like in cases of “The Writer and The Writer’s Brother” or in “The Little Jesus”, he becomes a vessel of words that transports the tale to our ears and our ears to the tale.”

*BroadwayWorld, “What keeps us intrigued are some solid performances led by Ebrahimzadeh, who anchors the production. He gives a wonderfully nuanced performance as Katurian, effortlessly channeling the character’s various layers. There’s the passionate storyteller, devoted brother and street-smart prisoner all of which we see in his relationships with each of the other characters.”

*DCist, “The actors are all willing and highly capable… with over-the-top-playfulness and imposing physical presences, bringing more than enough comedic chops to make the audience laugh… just enough barely-under-the-surface sadism to never make those laughs feel totally comfortable. Maboud Ebrahimzadeh’s Katurian plays off of this feeling well, knowing exactly when to play the straight man to [the] antics and when to open up and reveal some of Katurian’s many inner darkness (and there is more than enough to fill a show).”

*TakomaVoice, “Maboud Ebrahimzadeh is an engaging, but mentally tough, Katurian: fiercely loyal to his brother, yet ultimately most loyal of all to his calling as a writer. He makes you believe it.”

*DCMetroTheatreArts, “Ebrahimzadeh is a compelling Katurian, crafting a character who is disarmingly down to earth while flashing deep seated neuroses leading back to his parents’ horrific abuses.”

*Two Hours Traffic, “The ensemble is truly excellent, rising to the challenge of McDonagh’s dialogue and the plot’s dark twists and turns.  Ebrahimzadeh in particular is absolutely mesmerizing, from an affable charm in the first act to a haunting desperation as his situation takes an abrupt turn in Act II.”